World Diabetes Day: Be careful whenever you say “…something must kill a man”.

“I am finished!” was my exclamation when the doctor diagnosed me as diabetic. Oh! “My joy in this world has been punctured” were my words as I wept uncontrollably. Luckily, a Counsellor was on ground who

said that I should take it easy, and I was not going to die as a result of diabetes if I take the right steps from now. “Yes, your blood sugar level is outrageous but there is always a way out”, the Counsellor said.

For me, it was like a judgment day as I remembered in details;  the numerous times my friends, relatives and health workers tried to ask me to check what I take into my body as food as well as the quantity. Of course, the deed has been done. My role was highly contributory to my plight because I did not heed to the wise counsel on over eating and drinking.
I was one of those that argued that diabetes was hereditary and not what one consumes. I did so because I know my parents are not diabetics, so I had the erroneous believe that I would never become diabetic irrespective of what I consume. But I was wrong!  Today, I am a bitter example that a large degree of careless intake of junk, sugary foods and alcoholism could shoot ones sugar level beyond controllable limits. I would have learnt earlier but it is too late to reverse the hands of time. Consequently, I visit the hospital often, do my blood sugar test daily, and depend on sugar fighting drugs as well as diets. This is the price I have to pay for over enjoying myself!”
My name is Chamberlin and I choose to share this on World Diabetes Day to urge people to control their appetite for food and drinks. To tell people that over feeding is not an evidence of good living. To let people know that “something must kill a man” is a pathetic world view because it could lead to suffering and pains before death comes. Above all, that diabetic patients should not loose hope; but should take their treatment and care very seriously as it would help them to lead a normal life. Lastly, to encourage those taking care of diabetic patients irrespective of the challenges, to be strong in their good works because they are special people and their good works will never go unrewarded.



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Blood sugar level Diabetes Hereditary METANOIA Over eating and drinking